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Thanks for the heads-up on that, Evan. This is indeed a great new technology, Casio let the genie out of the bottle, and now this valiant effort from Panasonic.

I would be surprised if the 2 LED lamps and the green laser could not be replaced at all, but when I read that the DLP chip is sealed together with the 2 LED lamps and the tiny laser, I began to be concerned by that. Now, the light engine warranty is 10,000 hours from Panasonic, assuming the PJ should catastrophically fails after that and there is no light engine replacement available, then you had used the unit for 10K hours with no hope of extending that.

I watched the Panasonic demo of this machine on their Panasonic Projectors You Tube Channel, the demo is totally mute on how they came up with the 20,000 hours and whatever should happen after that. Also not clear to me is this: how can the expected life expectancy of an LED lamp be the same as that of a laser beam generator? In other words, will one age before the other, if yes, then the color composition of your image would have to be adjusted taking this into account.

Half brightness at 20,000 hours sounds great, however like I said I saw nothing stating this anywhere from Panasonic. Now, based on the review, the best looking images from this nominally rated 3500 ANSI lumen brightness PJ from Panasonic would be in the 700 to 1000 ANSI lumen range. Once this drops to say half at or around 20K hours, then we would be projecting an image with 350 to 500 lumen brightness, that is just not bright enough really for most apps, particularly if this is indeed intended mainly as a conference room projector where plenty of ambient light is anticipated.

This model and its sister models are touted as 24/7 capable projectors, well that would come to 8,760 hours per annum, so the 20,000 hour limit would be reached in less than 2.5 years if the unit is indeed being run continuously.