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Dan, you make a couple good points that I'd just like to expand upon a bit if I may. Regarding sharpness, there is no doubt that a single chip DLP projector will have an inherent advantage over any 3-chip design, be it LCD, LCOS or DLP, if the three chips are not precisely converged. Our Epson was properly converged, but in any side by side test, if the 3-chip machine is slightly out of alignment the single chip DLP will appear sharper. I wonder if this could have contributed to your assessment?

Beyond that, there is a reluctance among some videophiles to use sharpening features, due to the notion that with all sharpening features set to zero you are getting the most faithful and "undoctored" version of the signal. I mentioned in this article that if the Runco and Epson Sharpness controls are both set to zero, and the Epson's Super Resolution processor is also at zero, the Runco appears noticeably sharper. It may be in the demo you saw that these zero factory defaults were used. If so, I can fully appreciate and concur with your observation that the Runco was the sharper of the two.

However, when we engaged the sharpness tools on the Epson (setting Sharpness to +1 and Super Resolution to +2), it changed the ballgame. Suddenly the Epson was the sharper of the two. This was achieved without introducing any objectionable edge enhancement artifacts--the picture just looked more acutely defined, but still perfectly natural.

So I think it comes down to a philosophical decision--do you want to avoid the use of sharpness enhancing tools in order to get the purest rendering of the signal the projector is capable of, or do you engage those tools to get a digitally improved image? In my experience I now opt for the latter since image sharpening technology has gotten so refined. But others may prefer the more traditional videophile position on the issue.
BenQ