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Casio XJ-F210WN Projector Casio XJ-F210WN
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20000:1 Contrast Ratio
3500 Lumens
$1,050 Street Price
$1,049 MSRP

Casio XJ-F210WN for conference and classroom

Allan Abbott, April 7, 2016

The Casio XJ-F210WN, a newly announced 3500-lumen WXGA (1280x800) projector for business and education, will begin shipping this quarter at a recommended dealer price of $999.99.

The "WN" in the model number is Casio's designation for wireless networking. The F210WN handles wired networks out of the box, but it can also accommodate Casio's optional YW-40 USB wireless adapter for an extra $99.99. That small investment pays big dividends by extending the F210WN's connectivity to include wireless LANs, laptops, tablets, and smart phones after installing a Casio app called C-Assist.

The XJ-F210WN uses Casio's laser/LED/phosphor light engine which boasts a 20,000-hour life. If you used it 40 hours per week in an office or classroom, this projector would last almost ten years. The big advantage is that, assuming you run it anywhere near that long, the total cost of ownership should be considerably lower than for projectors using high pressure lamps that need replacement every few thousand hours.

With two HDMI ports along with VGA and USB inputs, the F210WN shows considerable versatility that will be appreciated by educators, businessmen, and road warriors alike. Its 8 lb. weight may be an issue for traveling to multiple venues, but that limitation is partially overcome by the variety of devices that can be connected directly and wirelessly to the F210WN.

Picture Quality

The XJ-F210WN does an excellent job with data images. Text, spreadsheets, and even architectural drawings are displayed with crisp, well-defined alphanumerics. Small typefaces are still readable even at maximum keystone correction (±30°). The image is sharply focused from corner-to-corner, and there are no visible noise artifacts. The picture shows more dynamic pop when contrast is increased and brightness is reduced. Fine lines are never blurred, and the focus and zoom controls are positive with no overshoot.

Video images are clear, sharp, and noise free. Color balance is excellent in the preset modes, but color saturation is a bit low and results in a somewhat flat look for most video images. This may not be a serious issue for classroom and boardroom settings, but the F210WN will probably not be your first choice for dedicated movie viewing.

Casio F210WN

In Theater mode, flesh tones are excellent with good shadow and highlight definition thanks to an improved contrast specification (20,000:1) over previous version of the laser/LED illumination combo. Photos looked especially good using the Natural color mode preset. The F210WN exhibits the DLP rainbow effects that some viewers are sensitive to, so if you are planning to do a lot of video viewing a demo is probably worth it to see if these artifacts are a problem for you.

The two brightest operating modes are Normal and Bright. When in either of those settings with an HDMI source, you only have controls for brightness, contrast, and color balance which is Casio's name for color temperature. There are three color balance options: warm, normal, and cold. Each does what you'd expect . . . warm emphasizes red and cold emphasizes blue. The Normal and Bright modes emphasize green to the point that it is clearly visible, so you might want to avoid them when a greenish bias is not desired.

In that case you can opt for one of the seven Light Control settings that can do a better job of color balancing. The F210WN offers four color mode choices: Standard, Graphics, Theater, and Natural, and while they each have their particular color and brightness biases, they offer a quick way to get a good image on the screen. Graphics mode is particularly effective for data presentations, and Natural mode brings out the best color accuracy for photo presentations, although, as with video images, color saturation could have been better.

Review Contents: Intro Key Features Performance Set Up
  Limitations and Conclusion

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Reader Comments(6 comments)

Posted May 31, 2016 3:15 AM

By Alex Finger

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Dear Robert R,

When and where You purchased FX210? I saw this model at ISE2016. Colors and contrast was fine. Incorrect try compare 4200 (you speak 4000) ANSI lamp PJ Unit and New 3500 Laser LED. At ISE 2016 was CASIO projectors with more than 18 000 hours of work. Believe it work good. It was bright and contrast. All it was acceptable. And please compare prices for Your PJ + Lamps and Just Laser projectors. I can imagine that You not thinking about power consumption. Try to check it, too.

Posted May 30, 2016 5:49 AM

By Joeseph O

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Hi Robert, I think you've had a bit more time since your comment to use the XJ-F210WN. Do you still feel unsatisfied w/ your purchase? I'm trying to figure out if LED is the way to go... Were you able to demo it before your purchase? Do you mind me asking where you purchased it from (staples?)

Posted Apr 12, 2016 9:30 AM

By Robert R

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I do have Casio XJ-F210WN and in my opinion it have very weak colors and low light output. Contrast ratio is great (white letters on black background).I compared Casio vs my old Epson 1940w (3500lm vs 4000lm) but difference looks way more then 500lm.

Posted Apr 11, 2016 5:00 PM

By chris

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"Light Engine Warranty Limit. The 20,000 hour light engine has warranty coverage for three years or 6,000 hours, whichever comes first."

What exactly does this mean?

I continue to read these claims. They are without qualification like the replacement lumen output. They are pretty much marketing hype. I have several LED (LG) projectors and all have lost output, some more drastically than others. And none were even close to the specified output at purchase.

Last year, I bought quite a few LED night lights at local dollar stores. Every one that was plugged in lost massive amounts of light after only a few months. They were blue. If you can, please try this simple (and cheap) LED longevity output experiment.

Posted Apr 11, 2016 7:12 AM

By Evan Powell, Editor

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Lasse, Casio does not publish any changes in estimated life of the projector based on the brightness setting you choose.

Posted Apr 11, 2016 2:11 AM

By Lasse Moer

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What is the light engine life by different settings of brightness?

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