Review Contents
Limitations and Conclusion
Highly Rated Projectors
Performance
Features
Ease of Use
Value
Intended Use:
Business
Epson PowerLite Pro G6900WU Projector Epson PowerLite Pro G6900WU
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Street Price: n/a
MSRP:$6,499
Contrast:5,000:1
Lumens:6000
Weight: 21.5 lbs
Resolution:1920x1200
Aspect Ratio:16:10
Technology:3 LCD
Lens:1.82x manual
Lens Shift:H + V
Lamp Life:2,000 Hrs
4,000 (eco)
Lamp Cost:$549.00
Warranty:3 year
Connectors:  S-Video, Composite (x2), RGB (x2), HDMI, HDBaseT, DisplayPort, Network, USB (x2), RS232
Video Formats:  480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i, 1080p/60, 576i, 576p

Epson PowerLite Pro G6900WU
LCD WUXGA Large Venue Projector

Bill Livolsi, February 27, 2014

Limitations

Light loss due to zoom. Long zoom lenses all share one thing in common: they reduce the amount of light that reaches the screen as you shrink the image down. All of the above readings were taken with the Standard Zoom lens at its widest position (the biggest image for a given throw distance). At maximum telephoto, light output is reduced by 35%. If you need to mount the Pro G6900WU at the long end of its throw range, maximum light output falls to 3260 lumens. That's enough of a drop that you might want to consider using the next lens in the lineup rather than trying to make do with the Standard Zoom.

Light loss due to lamp age. In the projector industry, all projectors carry brightness ratings based on new lamps. High pressure lamps typically diminish in light output about 25% during the first 500 hours of use, and degrade more slowly after that. At the end of a lamp's anticipated life it will be putting out 50% of its initial brightness. When planning any installation with any projector, one should make allowances for diminished lamp output over the life of the lamp. It can be advisable to plan for running in eco-mode during the early phase of the lamp's life and full power in the later phase in order to equalize brightness over the lamp's life. If maximum light output is required for the application, one might plan on replacing lamps more frequently than the estimated life. Replacement lamps on the Pro G6900WU are $549, which is typical for large venue projectors.

Screw closure on lamp door. On the Pro G6900WU, both the lens mount and the air filter cover use a tool-free closure -- a push-lever in the former case and a sliding lock in the latter. However, the lamp door still requires a screwdriver. Since the projector lamp (2,000/4,000 hour life) requires attention more often than the air filter (10,000 hour life), and lens swaps are unlikely once the projector is installed, it would be ideal if the lamp access door was tool-free as well.

Manual lens adjustments. The Pro G6900WU's manual zoom, focus, and shift adjustments may require a second person to eyeball the screen up close as these adjustments are being made at long throw distances. This is a non-issue once installed in a permanent location, but focus could be done with one person standing at the screen if the lens adjustments were powered.

Conclusion

Taken as a whole, the Pro G6900WU is an impressive package. The projector couples WUXGA native resolution and a small, light-weight package with high light output and great color performance to create a sparkling and engaging image. The projector's connection panel is packed tight with high-quality digital connections ranging from HDMI to DisplayPort to HDBaseT and HD-SDI. The projector is designed from the ground up with installers in mind. Arc correction, edge blending, and 360-degree projection make it possible to install the Pro G6900WU in just about any situation.

All in all, the Epson PowerLite Pro G6900WU is a powerful, highly capable WUXGA projector that strikes a compelling balance between affordability and feature set. It brings some high-end features to a more affordable projector than the massive two-lamp models. It is among the most attractively priced WUXGA projectors available at its brightness level. For that reason and many others, the G6900WU is an excellent value in today's market.

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Performance
Review Contents: The Viewing Experience Setup and Configuration Key Features Performance
  Limitations and Conclusion

Reader Comments(2 comments)

Posted Mar 16, 2014 5:19:15 PM

By Stunko

Post a Comment Alert Moderator
The projectors are getting lighter and easier to operate. Whereby it would seem that the REVIEWS of these projectors are getting to be longer.... and longer... and longer still.

Really, could we not have said everything found in this ultra verbose review in 1/2 the number of lines? One-fourth?

Just sayin'....

Posted Mar 2, 2014 9:57:42 AM

By Joe K.

Post a Comment Alert Moderator
Now that you've seen this, what would be your opinion of using a G6450WU for a video projector for the home in a high ambient light situation and a 106" screen, in our case. I understand we would not have 3D (unless we wanted to stack), but that's not an issue for us. I was a bit concerned about noise, but it sounds like it's not too bad.

The high contrast of the 5030 is great, but doesn't help much when there is light washing over the screen, which is why I'm considering replacing our 6500UB with something like this.

Your input and thoughts would be most appreciated and I bet others in our situation might be wondering the same thing.

Thanks!

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