Review Contents
Overview
Best Home Theater Projectors
Performance
Features
Ease of Use
Value
Sanyo PLV-WF10 Projector Sanyo PLV-WF10
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900:1 Contrast Ratio
4000 Lumens
Street Price: n/a
$12,995 MSRP

Sanyo PLV-WF10 Large Venue Widescreen

Evan Powell, February 25, 2004

Sanyo builds a wider variety of LCD projectors than any other manufacturer in the business. With about 30 models in current production, Sanyo targets unique market niches like no other vendor. And the newly released PLV-WF10 is a prime example. With the WF10, Sanyo has combined high resolution widescreen LCD panels with a two-lamp 4000 ANSI lumen light engine to produce a large venue video projector unlike anything else on the market. Though the WF10 could be deployed in an oversized residential home theater, the ideal use is in any larger venue where high quality video and HDTV is required. The WF10 is a quintessential sports bar projector, and college-level film studies departments would want one in every classroom.

Product Overview

Specifications. 4000 ANSI lumens, 900:1 contrast, native 16:9 widescreen format with 1366x768 resolution LCD panels.

Compatibility. HDTV 1080i-50, 1080i-60, 1035i, 720p, 575p, 575i, 576i, 480p, 480i, and computer resolutions up to UXGA (1600x1200). NTSC, NTSC 4.43, PAL, PAL-N, PAL-M, SECAM.

Lenses and throw distance. There is no standard lens with the WF10; all lenses are optional at extra cost. Most are between $1150 and $5,000, and one extreme lens is $16,395. Depending upon the lens selected, a 100" diagonal image can be thrown from as little as 7.5 feet to as much as 64 feet. A 300" diagonal image is achieved between 23 and 225 feet. Most lens options are motorized zoom, but two are fixed length, manual focus.

Vertical lens shift. With the lens in center position it throws an image with the centerline of the lens intersecting the center of the image. Vertical lens shift will move the image up and down on the screen. The degree of movement available depends upon the lens in use, but the range varies between 90% and 100% of a full picture height in both directions. This is the only option for obtaining a squared up picture on the screen; you may not tilt the projector and square it with vertical keystone correction, as this is not a feature available on the WF10. There is however horizontal keystone correction if you must place the unit off the horizontal axis to the screen. This works with all operating modes except "natural wide," which is the mode used to stretch a 4:3 image to fill the 16:9 screen. If this mode is selected, the horizontal keystone correction is deactivated.

Two-lamp design. The WF10 uses two 250W UHP lamps to achieve the maximum lumen output. The user may turn off either lamp to conserve lamp life. This cuts lumen output in half. Sanyo does not publish lamp life specifications on this unit.

Fan noise. The fan noise on the WF10 is too high for use in a normal home theater environment unless specific steps are taken during installation to provide sound damping without interfering with its cooling system. However by large venue standards, the noise level on this unit is moderate and low in pitch. Fan noise is not reduced when one lamp is deactivated.

Modular connection panel. Located on the left side of the unit as viewed from the rear. This panel houses three terminal boards which can be configured to suit the needs of the user. Terminal board options include one with a single DVI-I port, one with 5 BNCs, and an AV terminal with two composite BNC jacks and an S-video port. They can be mixed and matched in the three slots as the user desires. All terminal boards include audio inputs to drive the two 3W onboard speakers. In addition to the three variable terminal board slots there is a fourth fixed terminal the offers a serial DB9 input and output, a USB port, and a wired remote control. A set of audio outputs on this board can be used to feed an external audio amplifier.

Installation options. Table mount, ceiling mount, rear projection.

Warranty. Three years.

Review Contents: Overview Performance Performance and Conclusion