Sony Handycam HDR-PJ650V:
Multi-functional with a Projector Inside

Laura Clinton, May 30, 2013
Contents
The Projector Inside

One of the most interesting features in the Sony Handycam is the built-in projector located in the LCD screen. You can playback your recordings and images almost immediately as long as you have a flat, white surface and dim lighting. If you prefer to view the images on your television, you also have the option of connecting the camera to your TV with the provided HDMI cable. However, I am more of a no-strings attached kind of girl, so this projector fits my needs. With a resolution of 640 x 360, the projected images are reasonably crisp and detailed, even up to 100 inches diagonal, but it does not reproduce the full HD resolution that the Handycam captures. If you want to see the results of your movie-making in full resolution, you can play it back on a high def TV, or better yet display it on a super large screen with one of today's amazing home theater projectors.

Despite it's low resolution, the on-board projector was invaluable when it came to my son's training. If he was struggling with a particular move, we would playback the video on the concrete floor in a dark section of the facility to assess it with his coach for immediate correction. Since I was projecting onto the ground while I was standing, the largest image produced was 30 inches diagonal. This size was ideal for the trace amount of light filling the corner and the clarity of the recorded images allowed me to read the brand name on my son's cleats.

The Handycam's built-in projector will not only display videos and images taken by the camera, but you can hook up your computer or smartphone to it as well. Using my Apple digital AV adapter (sold separately), I was able to connect the Handycam to my iPhone 4s with the provided HDMI cable. My youngest found a dark corner and was able to entertain himself and a couple of friends by projecting Adventure Time with the Handycam via Netflix on my phone.

Setting up the Handycam was relatively easy; it's a matter of attaching the battery pack and connecting it to your wall socket via the included AC adapter. It has a short, built-in USB cable that nestles nicely into the hand strap, which also gives you the option of charging through your laptop. If the built-in cable is too short, Sony provides a USB support cable that simply extends the length. The only disadvantage is that charging through your computer takes roughly double the time (2 hours versus 4 hours). After the battery has charged, you are ready to start your double life as a semi-professional camera person.

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Introduction
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Limitations and Conclusion
Contents: Introduction The Projector Inside Limitations and Conclusion

Reader Comments(2 comments)

Posted Jun 10, 2014 11:35:26 AM

By Terry

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Is the projector DLP or LCOS technology?

Posted Feb 19, 2014 4:08:45 AM

By SURYA SAHAN

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simply superb

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