LG HU710PW 4K DLP Projector
  • Performance
  • 4
  • Features
  • Ease of Use
  • Value
Pros
  • Long lasting laser-LED hybrid light source
  • WebOS streaming with authorized Netflix app
  • HDR10 Support with Dynamic Tone Mapping
  • HDMI 2.1 (up to 24 GBps with ALLM support), HDMI 2.0 with eARC
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, AirPlay2
  • Built-in Stereo speakers
Cons
  • Limited brightness in the best picture modes
  • Bright picture mode is very green
  • External power supply
  • Light spill with inverted ceiling mounts
Our Take

The LG HU710PW is another solid entry into LG’s CineBeam line of home theater projectors with a wealth of features and a picture that should please enthusiasts and more casual users, but it's limited brightness may be a drawback for some.

LG HU710 front angle

The LG CineBeam HU710PW is a new 2022 entry in the company's line of projectors targeted mostly towards home theater, though with some features that fit nicely into the lifestyle category as well. It's also another LG laser projector, but with a slight twist as it utilizes LG's Hybrid Light Source technology that uses both a laser diode and LEDs. The key benefit of projectors utilizing a solid-state light source, whether laser or LED, are the long-life span and elimination of bulb replacements. This projector boasts an impressive 30,000 hours of life expectancy, with 20,000 hours at full brightness.

Until recently, most traditional long-throw projectors with laser light sources have been on the fairly expensive side. That began changing last year with LG's CineBeam HU810PW priced at $2,999, so this entry coming in at an MSRP of $2,499 at the time of its release presents another great option for users who want a respectable 4K laser projector that won't break the bank. Those familiar with the HU810PW, which was reviewed favorably by ProjectorCentral, will see that this projector resembles it in many ways in its design and feature set, but with some new additions and refinements.

Features

The new hybrid light engine in the HU710 employs a blue laser diode with a static, solid-state phosphor chip together with a pair of LEDs modules, one red and one blue. The laser and phosphor chip are used to generate the green primary, while the red and blue LEDs are used directly for reproducing those colors; the HU710 does not use a color wheel, though individual colors must still be presented sequentially to the single DLP chip. During my time with the projector I thankfully did not experience any rainbows in any content. The projector has rated ANSI lumens of 2,000, which makes it considerably less bright than the 2,700-lumen all-laser HU810. But it offers very nearly the same rated color gamut at 94% DCI-P3.

This projector offers UHD resolution of 3840x2160 via use of the Texas Instruments DLP 0.47-inch XPR (Expanded Pixel Resolution) chipset to produce 8.3 million discrete pixels. This chipset takes a DMD with native 1920x1080 resolution and applies a four-phase pixel shift to reproduce the full 3840x2160 resolution in each frame of UHD video. So, while it's technically not a true native 4K projector, with all else being equal the 4K images produced by this projector are essentially indistinguishable from a native 4K image in typical viewing conditions.

LG HU710 light engine
The HU710's hybrid light engine uses a single blue laser (that creates green with a yellow phosphor chip) and two LEDs—a red and blue—for reproducing those colors.

With the recent changes to HDMI certifications and the HDMI 2.1 spec, some of the more common attributes that would be used to define an HDMI 2.1 device such as bandwidth of the port, high refresh rates such as 4k@120hz, etc. no longer really apply. With this in mind, the HU710 has three HDMI ports. HDMI 1 meets HDMI 2.1 criteria but with 24 Gbps input and support for ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode). Despite the HDMI 2.1 spec, this projector is unable to accept and display a 4k/120Hz signal as might be gotten from current Sony and Xbox game consoles, or gaming PCs. This would require at least 32 Gbps bandwidth. The remaining two ports are HDMI 2.0, with eARC supported on HDMI 2. With the inclusion of eARC, the projector is capable of sending back uncompressed audio to a standalone audio system such as a soundbar, AVR, or surround processor for Dolby Atmos support.

Rounding out the input/outputs on the device is an optical digital audio out, a LAN port that is 100Base-TX with support of up to 100 Mbps, and two USB 2.0 ports which are capable of being used for media such as photos, music and video. This projector also has two IR receivers, one located on the rear of the unit, the other on the front.

After the initial setup you're greeted on screen with the homepage of webOS 6.0, which at time of this review is the most current version of webOS. Pre-installed on this projector are a fully authorized Netflix app, as well as Prime Video, Disney+, YouTube, and AppleTV. It is not often to find a projector that has an authorized Netflix app, so this is very welcome to see. The two apps I was looking for but which were unfortunately unavailable in the LG app store are HBO Max and Hulu. However, with the projector's built in AirPlay2 and MiraCast features this was easily circumvented by simple using a mobile device and mirroring to the projector. It worked flawlessly and supported playback up to 4K/30Hz.

Installation options in the HU710 menu allow for Front, Front Ceiling, Rear, and Rear Ceiling. Ceiling installation is facilitated with threaded sockets on the underside for four M4 mounting screws. The projector has manual lens shift with a range of +/- 60% vertical and +/- 24% horizontal, operated via dials located on the side of the projector. Manual 1.6x zoom and focus are also available on the top of the unit underneath a slide cover. The slide cover on my sample was very tight and care was required when sliding it open so as not to move and misalign the projector. The zoom and focus rings also have a tightness to them that lacks a smooth motion when making adjustments towards the center of the adjustment rings, while operating the levers at the left and right extremes had smoother and more refined adjustment. On the plus side, all the controls stayed put once they were dialed in.

For less-than-ideal positioning the HU710 does support digital keystone correction for edge adjustment from 4, 9, or 15 points. It is as always recommended to avoid using such features to maintain integrity of image quality, however, in a pinch for a temporary placement it is a viable option.

The HU710 is fairly compact and light, measuring 10.2 x 4.8 x 15.4 inches (WHD) and weighing in at 14.3 pounds. Placement and ceiling mounting should be planned accordingly, with special consideration for the external power brick that is 7.25 inches in length and 1.25 inches in height, with an overall cord length of approximately 8 feet. If you invert the projector for a ceiling mount, the brick is just barely small enough to be hidden above the projector's body. Still, while I'm sure the detached power supply saves weight and size for the projector body, it's awkward to manage for any ceiling installation.

LG HU710 lifestyle1

Another thing to note regarding ceiling installation is that when the projector is inverted for ceiling mounting it unfortunately suffers from the same light spill onto the ceiling from the lens that was seen on the CineBeam HU810PW. This light spill can also be seen when the projector is positioned on a table or shelf, though it's not as noticeable as compared to inverted ceiling-mount installations. As with the HU810, you can mask a portion of the lens opening with a card or other barrier to eliminate the spill without affecting the on-screen image if it's bothersome, but it does mean having to tape or glue something to the front of the projector. [Editor's Note: You can see what this spill looks like on the HU810, and how a card can be used to fix it, at about 6:10 into our YouTube video review.]

Image size will be determined by the distance to the screen in conjunction with the manual zoom ring. LG lists the HU710 as having a 1.3-2.08 throw ratio, and being capable of throwing a 40-inch diagonal image from 3.6-5.9 feet, a 150-inch diagonal from 14.1-22.6 feet, and its maximum, massive 300-inch diagonal image from 28.5-45.9 ft. I found their listing for a 100-inch diagonal image between the distance of 9.5 and 15 feet to be accurate; placement of the HU710 for my review came in at 12 feet, 2 inches for a 100-inch diagonal image. As always it is important to keep in mind, however, that the larger the image, the higher the impact on overall light output, and with its 2,000 ANSI lumen spec, you're likely to start running out of steam at image sizes much larger than 100 inches. To determine throw distance for your preferred screen size you can utilize the ProjectorCentral LG CineBeam HU710 projection calculator.

LG HU710 remote

Included with the HU710 is LG's Magic Remote, with some slight changes from the one that was packaged with the HU810. The backlighting from the HU810 remote has been retained, but changes on this version include dedicated buttons for Netflix and Disney+, a dedicated HDMI 1 source button, and a button for the geometric edge adjustment. LG has removed the dedicated play and pause buttons. Some buttons have also been moved around to new locations, and not always to the user's benefit. For example, the gear-wheel Settings button that's crucial to getting into any of the projector's menus now sits inconveniently at the upper right top of the remote as opposed to its previous, more ideal placement near the directional arrows. The remote was responsive overall; though the unit is rather slow when initially going into the settings menu, once there it was quickly navigated and the remote remained very familiar and easy to use.

In usual fashion with LG's 4K projectors, the HU710 includes HDR Dynamic Tone Mapping, which is always welcome to see as it is not a common feature found on projectors in this range. Dynamic Tone Mapping adjusts the image based on frame-by-frame signal changes to fully utilize the brightness range of the projector, as opposed to a fixed brightness range that may not be able to favorably display the content shown or a sliding range that may require some kind of manual adjustment to do so. Additionally, this projector also supports HGiG (HDR Gaming Interest Group), an HDR option utilized by the newer consoles such as Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5 with compatible games. HGiG, which is a choice in the HDR Tone Mapping menu when in the picture mode Game Optimizer, utilizes the tone mapping set within the consoles themselves to avoid double tone-mapping at the projector level and causing clipping of details not intended by the game creators.

Another game-centric feature that has been included in this projector is LG's new Game Optimizer menu. This feature is only available when using an HDMI input and is available in any picture mode, though it is only mated with the projector's low latency input lag when you're in the similarly named Game Optimizer mode. This Game Optimizer menu provides gamers with features such as an FPS counter, game genre selections that alter the image based on game type, and various other picture setting options to provide a more pleasing gaming experience. Filmmaker Mode is also included in the HU710, which recognizes a flag in certain content and automatically disables processing that would impact picture quality outside of what was originally intended by the content creators. Not all content contains the flag, but you'll see this mode pop up more often these days on streamed content from the major services such as Amazon Prime.

The HU710 contains built-in stereo speakers that are 5W each, which are fairly thin and lacking in bass. The built-in speakers can provide a sufficient solution in a pinch depending on the room conditions, but for more permanent installs it is highly recommended to use either an AVR, audio processor, or soundbar. Another alternative would be to use the projector's built-in Bluetooth to send audio to a speaker system; the HU710 offers an A/V sync control to address any lip-sync issues.

LG HU710 side dials

With the wealth of features the HU710 supports, one feature that is unfortunately not supported is 3D—though with the relatively low light output of this projector I cannot say I would be confident in how it would be presented.

Performance

Color Modes. The HU710 has nine picture modes for SDR and seven modes for HDR. SDR modes include Vivid, Standard, Cinema, Sports, Game, Filmmaker Mode, Brightest, Expert Bright, and Expert Dark. HDR picture modes are Vivid, Standard, Cinema Home, Cinema, Game, Filmmaker Mode and Brightest. The Brightest picture modes have a very heavy bias towards green in order to push luminance to reach the 2,000 ANSI specification. All modes also actually have a slight green bias to them in the lower end of the brightness range, which could be seen when performing initial measurements. After about 40% brightness, the bias in most modes shifted towards blue. This ultimately results in all picture modes being deficient in red, even in the Warm color temperature.

Initial impressions of the out of the box (OOTB) performance was that Brightest mode in either SDR or HDR was so green-biased as to not be usable, and that the most usable modes for SDR were Cinema, Filmmaker Mode, and Expert Bright. For HDR signals, Cinema Home and Cinema were the most accurate and provided a pleasing picture, though it was evident that all the modes needed some work. I came to these conclusions from initially reviewing content using the built-in apps like Netflix and Apple TV, and also looking at my Xbox Series X, PlayStation 5, and Oppo UDP-203 Blu-ray player. It was also evident that none of the picture modes were terribly bright, though they still had an inherent green bias using Warm color temperature, a bias that was further exaggerated for modes where the default color temperature was Medium. So, ultimately, none of the modes were particularly accurate out of the box.

LG HU710 lifestyle2

This projector would be a candidate for calibration—either a DIY or having a professional come and dial it in. For those who choose to pass on getting it calibrated, sticking with Cinema or Filmmaker Mode for dark room SDR viewing, and Expert Bright for either dark or bright room SDR, would be my advice as these modes provide the most eye-pleasing image. For HDR, the best out of box choice is Cinema Home (HDR).

Users who calibrate the projector can expect excellent results. The HU710 offers full white balance adjustments with 2-point, 10-point, and 22-point controls, and a full CMS (color management system) for primary and secondary color points. Considering this projector borrows LG's webOS platform from its TVs it's not surprising to also see the same level of in-depth image control available as they provide on their flatpanels. Compared with LG's TVs, however, I did find the 10- and 22-point white balance controls in the HDR picture modes had relatively limited range.

The HU710 does not offer a dynamic iris; the iris on this projector is fixed with a range of 11 settings labeled 0 to 10 with three presets that are associated with different picture modes. The preset settings are Bright Room, Medium, and Dark Room, which relate to the following values in the adjustable User setting: Bright Room=10, Medium=8, Dark Room=5. In lieu of a dynamic iris the projector utilizes Adaptive Contrast, which has the settings of High, Medium, Low, or Off. This functions by adjusting the laser to fit the scene and provide more contrast, making dark areas darker and bright areas brighter. I found the Medium setting usually provided the best balance in functionality for this feature.

The HU710 did a fairly good job at resolving shadow detail and produced fairly impressive blacks. Motion was actually quite good as well without the need to utilize any of the frame interpolation TruMotion settings, which produced varying degrees of soap opera effect. To my eye, SOE usually makes motion appear unnatural; movement almost seems as if everything is gliding as opposed to, say, naturally walking. I skipped the presets and opted to select the TruMotion setting of User with a De-Judder value of 2, as it offered some mild benefit without producing artifacts or soap opera effect. Using the TruMotion, the HU710 was capable of resolving some of the more difficult test patterns such as "Sarah on a Hammock" from the Spears & Munsil test discs.

I calibrated the HU710 with Calman Ultimate calibration software from Portrait Displays, a Colorimetry Research CR-250 Spectroradiometer, a Colorimetry Research CR-100 Colorimeter, and a Murideo 8K Seven Generator. Based on previous observations I measured the three most eye pleasing SDR picture modes and opted to use Expert Bright as my baseline. The projector was placed 12 feet 2 inches away and utilized zoom to project a 100-inch, 16:9 image on a reference 1.3 gain, 135-inch 2.35:1 Stewart Filmscreen. Expert Bright had fairly large dE (DeltaE) errors, which is the metric used to determine the visible error. It has been determined that anything over a dE of 3 is visible, anything over 2.3 is a just noticeable difference for trained eyes and anything below 2.3 should ideally not be seen to the eye. Grayscale pre-calibration measurements of Expert Bright had dE errors all over 3 with exception of a single grayscale point. Color gamut color points for the Rec. 709 color space for the HU710 were all off axis and had dE errors over 3 as well. Gamma tracked correctly per menu selection, meaning 2.4 tracked as 2.4, 2.2 as 2.2. I took this opportunity to measure HDR as well and settled on using Cinema Home for calibration based on the need for brightness and how well it tracked the EOTF for HDR.

Utilizing the 2-point, 10, and 22-point grayscale controls for adjustments I targeted the production industry standard D65 neutral gray white point. Afterwards, a full CMS (color management system) calibration for the RGBCMY primaries and secondary colors was performed as well. As noted above, and as I saw in the recently reviewed LG PF610P, the multi-point white balance controls weren't as precise as seen on LG's TVs, and the CMS lacked the range to fully correct errors in HDR.

Post calibration for SDR resulted in Expert Bright being calibrated to peak 26.3 fL/90.1 nits in my dark theater room, which was perfect and close to my normal target of 110 nits/32.1 fL for SDR projection. HDR post calibration for the HU710 measured roughly 4% higher in peak nits/fL.

LG HU710 front right

I was very excited to see the overall post-calibration errors had decreased considerably. Post-calibration dE for the Calman ColorChecker for SDR came in at 1.6 dE average with a max of 2.8 dE. Grayscale had a max dE of 1.6 on one grayscale point only, all other points came in under a dE of 1. CMS resulted in an average of 1.8 dE with a max of 3.8 dE for 100% saturated Magenta. All color saturation points below 100% ranged anywhere between under 0.5 dE and 2.1 dE. HDR post calibration resulted in a very flat grayscale and CMS within target, though due to the lack of range within the control it could not fully be dialed in for luminance. (The Calman ColorChecker measures accuracy on a wide range of color swatches corresponding to skin tones, blue sky, etc.)

1080p/SDR Viewing. The devices I used for reviewing content post calibration were the projector's internal apps, AppleTV, and Oppo UDP-203 Blu-ray player. Also, I do want to note that in all viewing of SDR and HDR, along with not spotting any rainbows, I did not observe any laser speckle.

I began reviewing Gravity on HBO Max via AirPlay2, including the initial opening and debris strike on the space shuttle Explorer. The HU710 handled this scene very well. It was sharp and detailed, and it handled the changes in APL (average picture level) of the scene wonderfully. The only thing it couldn't do was fully resolve all the stars in the various space scenes which I know to be there. Every other aspect of the scene was rendered very well, including the subtle differences in whites between the shuttle and space suits. The earth itself was vibrant and detailed, with the spectacular view of the atmosphere. The key scene where I was possibly expecting to see the HU710 struggle was the moment when Sandra Bullock's character is thrust into space and spins off into the dark. The APL in this scene changes quite often and can slip up a display, but I was glad not to see any unnatural dimming or brightening as the projector kept up with the light in this scene.

The Last Kingdom, Season 1 (via the Netflix built-in app) has an interesting color palette as it uses green and blue to convey the medieval time period. Yet, at times, this British TV series offers rich color for conveying banners and gowns, as well as varying subtle differences in complexions and skin tone. Every episode I watched within the first season reproduced skin tones accurately while maintaining the overall look of the show with its unique color palette. Occasionally, in scenes with very bright sunsets or sunrises, some detail was lost where you would normally see some clouds. But outside of that the show was reproduced as faithfully as when I watched it on an OLED.

UHD/HDR Viewing. The HU710 performed well in HDR even though it was not particularly bright. Much of this is thanks to LG's DTM (Dynamic Tone Mapping). With DTM enabled, it produced a pleasing image without blowing out the brightest highlights, which happened often when DTM was turned off. I would go so far as to say as that using DTM with this projector is mandatory—without it the image was not presented correctly, with too much detail lost.

While reviewing HDR I watched several movies that I'm very familiar with, starting with Aquaman, an unusually bright title with a Maximum Content Light Level (MaxCLL) of 3,241 nits. The scene that stood out the most was the battle of kings at the end of the movie where Arthur fights against Ocean Master. The peak highlights on Ocean Master's and Aquaman's armor were well rendered, and the detail of various ships was clearly seen in the background even through all the stormy ocean weather. During this scene, the camera would occasionally cut to where Aquaman's ally Mera is watching the battle, and her vibrant red hair was the correct, expected shade and not oversaturated as I have seen on some lesser projectors. The detail that was resolved and the sharpness of the unscaled 4K picture was good, and much better than I expected. The one thing that was missing—and unfortunately the most important thing—was enough overall brightness needed to really make the scene pop and stand out as I've seen on more powerful projectors.

The Greatest Showman was the next movie I watched. I assume many enthusiast readers are familiar with several scenes of this movie, most particularly the intro as it is often used for audio demos as well as visual demos. In the opening musical number, Hugh Jackman's bright red ringmaster's coat is very vibrant and saturated, and could easily be oversaturated if the projector in question is unable to actually reproduce red. I was glad to see this wasn't the case. It did lack a little bit of luminance and punch but with all the colors similarly lacking this missing didn't stand out too much. The fire that is breathed by the performers when the lions jump through the hoops was not blown out and retained the detail I expected to see. The entire scene was colorful and quite impactful considering the projector's somewhat tame HDR brightness. It seems like, for HDR, bright content with an overall higher APL is needed to really make the HU710 shine.

LG HU710 greatest showman
The Greatest Showman was colorful and vibrant without being oversaturated on the HU710. (Photo Credit: 20th Century Fox)

The last movie I watched was How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World, specifically the spot where Hiccup and Astrid fly into the hidden world where Toothless was shown as king. On the descent into the hidden world the scene is very colorful, while also displaying various black stone pillars. I was rather surprised and pleased at the HU710's ability to produce a respectable black. It didn't rival higher end projectors that are known for their blacks, and I didn't expect it to, but it was still very good. The Adaptive Contrast does a nice job producing more than adequate blacks while maintaining peak highlights of a scene. As Hiccup and Astrid flew through the colorful iridescent caverns, the scene didn't display any brightness fluctuations and maintained a constant APL despite the changing light conditions. I've watched this scene many times on various projectors and was satisfied with the image it produced.

Conclusion

The LG CineBeam HU710PW is a well thought-out and very interesting projector thanks to its unusual hybrid light source. It benefits from the strengths of its solid-state technologies, both laser and LED. However, the main thing that hurts its performance is its overall lack of brightness, especially for HDR. Despite the 2,000-lumen specification for its brightest mode that is heavily green-biased, the actual usable picture modes that offer an accurate image come in with ANSI lumen measurements that are about half of the rated spec. This limits the HU710's use to smaller screen sizes and environments where you can mostly control the ambient light.

That being said, it can be calibrated to be extremely accurate, and in a dark room on a 100-inch screen it is a very usable projector with most content. The HU710 is also feature-rich. If one is able to compromise on light output and lean towards the heavy feature set it becomes a more attractive offering after factoring in things like dynamic tone mapping that works extremely well, HGiG compatibility, a built-in authorized Netflix app, eARC, compact size and a flexible lens for setup, and a solid-state light source with an extremely fast power-on time of 6 seconds.

Ultimately, given its brightness limitations, I'm not sure I would recommend the HU710 as a first choice for a serious enthusiast, though for the right environment I could recommend it as an alternative or one to consider. If you are more on the casual-enthusiast or viewer side of things it is definitely a viable option, especially for dark-room viewing.

In any event, I'm very interested to see what this new hybrid light source design will lead to in the future as they are able to make it brighter. It could be an evolution or a revolution—that's yet to be seen. Right now, it certainly has potential.

Measurements

Brightness. The HU710PW is rated for 2,000 ANSI lumens. The brightest picture mode in both SDR and HDR was Brightest while in Minimum Energy Saving power mode. In SDR, this picture mode measured 2,060 ANSI lumens, which is 2.95% over its rated specification. Brightest mode in HDR measured 1,970 ANSI lumens, which is 1.5% under the rated spec.

Moving the Energy Saving from Minimum to Medium resulted in a 20% reduction of light output in any picture mode, while Maximum resulted in a 40% reduction in light output.

LG CineBeam HU710PW ANSI Lumens

SDR Mode Minimum Medium Maximum
Vivid 1,159 927 695
Standard 1,211 968 726
Cinema 857 685 514
Sports 1,296 1,036 777
Game 1,189 951 713
Filmmaker Mode 850 680 510
Brightest 2,060 1,648 1,236
Expert Bright 1,057 845 634
Expert Dark 843 674 505
HDR Mode
Vivid 1,307 1,045 784
Standard 1,262 1,009 784
Cinema Home 1,053 842 631
Cinema 1,052 841 631
Game 1,302 1,041 781
Filmmaker Mode 1,053 842 631
Brightest 1,970 1,576 1,182

Zoom Lens Light Loss. The HU710PW's light loss when shifting from the widest zoom ring position to its longest telephoto ring position was 25%.

Brightness Uniformity. The HU710PW projecting a 100-inch diagonal image resulted in measured brightness uniformity of 80% while in wide angle zoom, and 79% in telephoto zoom. The brightest portion of the screen was the center sector, and the dimmest the top right. The difference in brightness on a full white screen was noticeable, however in viewing normal content it was not.

Fan Noise. LG rates the fan noise for the HU710PW at the following dB for the respective modes: Eco 26dB(A), Medium 27dB(A), Minimum 28dB(A). Using Room EQ Wizard software and a Umik-1 microphone, my theater room ambient noise floor is 33.3 dBA. Measuring the HU710PW at approximately 4 feet away from multiple locations (all 4 sides as well as above) the HU710PW measured between 35.1 - 37.3 dBA in all picture modes, both SDR and HDR, with the respective Energy Saving Modes from Minimum to Maximum.

Input Lag. Input lag measurements while in Game Optimizer picture mode (which activates the Low Latency feature) varied between 50.8 to 56.5 milliseconds with 1080p/60Hz signals, and 55.1 to 64.1 in 2160p/60Hz. This is suitable for casual gaming though not sufficient for highly competitive games that require fast user response times.

Connections

LG HU710 connections
  • HDMI 2.1 (x1; HDCP 2.3; 24Gbps), HDMI 2.0b (x2; HDCP 2.3; eARC HDMI 2)
  • LAN 100Base-TX
  • USB 2.0 (x2; photo and video playback)
  • TOSLINK Optical digital Output

Calibrated Settings

Calibrated image settings from any third-party do not account for the significant potential for sample-to-sample variation, nor the different screen sizes and materials, lighting, lamp usage, or other environmental factors that can affect image quality. Projectors should always be calibrated in the user's own space and tuned for the expected viewing conditions. However, the settings provided here may be a helpful starting point for some. Always record your current settings before making adjustments so you can return to them as desired. Refer to the Performance section for some context for each calibration.

SDR

Picture Mode: Expert Bright Room

Advanced Settings

Brightness
Adjust Contrast: 84
Screen Brightness: 50
Auto Dynamic Contrast: Low
Gamma: 2.4
Black Level: Auto

Brightness Optimizer
Iris Mode: Bright Room
Adaptive Contrast: Medium

Color
Color Depth: 50
Tint: 0
Color Depth: Auto Detect
Fine Tune
Color Upgrade: User Selection

Color: Red
Saturation: -7
Tint: 0
Luminance: -3

Color: Green
Saturation: -5
Tint: -14
Luminance: 0

Color: Blue
Saturation: -3
Tint: -2
Luminance: 0

Color: Cyan
Saturation: -6
Tint: -1
Luminance: 7

Color: Magenta
Saturation: -6
Tint: -8
Luminance: 2

Color: Yellow
Saturation: -1
Tint: -1
Luminance: 0

White Balance

Method: 2 Points

Point: High
Red: 27
Green: -8
Blue: -11

Point: Low
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 1

Method: 10 Point Signal Level

Signal Level: 20
Red: -3
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 10
Red: -10
Green: 0
Blue: -6

Method: 22 Points Signal Level

Signal Level: 100
Red: 14
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 95
Red: -1
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 90
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 85
Red: 0
Green: -1
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 80
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 75
Red: 1
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 70
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 65
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 60
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 55
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 50
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 45
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: -1

Signal Level: 40
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 35
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 30
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 25
Red: -8
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 20
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 15
Red: -8
Green: 0
Blue: -4

Signal Level: 10
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 7.5
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Signal Level: 5
Red: -14
Green: 0
Blue: -10

Signal Level: 2.5
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Color Temperature: Warm

Clarity
Adjust Sharpness: 10
Super Resolution: Off
Noise Reduction: Off
MPEG Noise Reduction: Off
Smooth Gradation: Low

HDR

Picture Mode: Expert Bright Room

Advanced Settings

Brightness
Adjust Contrast: 100
Screen Brightness: 50
Auto Dynamic Contrast: Low
HDR Tone Mapping: On
Gamma: 2.2
Black Level: Auto

Brightness Optimizer
Iris Mode: Bright Room
Adaptive Contrast: Medium

Color
Color Depth: 53
Tint: 0
Color Depth: Auto Detect
Fine Tune
Color Upgrade: User Selection

Color: Red
Saturation: 0
Tint: -1
Luminance: 2

Color: Green
Saturation: 1
Tint: 0
Luminance: 1

Color: Blue
Saturation: 4
Tint: -2
Luminance: 5

Color: Cyan
Saturation: 2
Tint: 3
Luminance: 10

Color: Magenta
Saturation: 16
Tint: -19
Luminance: 10

Color: Yellow
Saturation: 2
Tint: -2
Luminance: 12

White Balance

Method: 2 Points

Point: High
Red: 9
Green: -30
Blue: -34

Point: Low
Red: -9
Green: 2
Blue: 0

Method: 10 Point Code value

Code value: 1023
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Code value: 686
Red: 3
Green: 0
Blue: -8

Code value: 557
Red: 13
Green: -1
Blue: -5

Code value: 474
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Code value: 436
Red: -17
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Code value: 402
Red: -16
Green: 0
Blue: 5

Code value: 376
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Code value: 349
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Code value: 306
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Code value: 225
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Clarity
Adjust Sharpness: 10
Super Resolution: Off
Noise Reduction: Off
MPEG Noise Reduction: Off
Smooth Gradation: Low

For more detailed specifications and connections, check out our LG CineBeam HU710PW projector page.

To buy this projector, use Where to Buy online, or get a price quote by email direct from Projector Central authorized dealers using our E-Z Quote tool.

 
Comments (15) Post a Comment
Tim Posted Feb 16, 2022 12:00 PM PST
Are there any rumors of an update to the LG HU85LA? Seems odd these new connections would only be available in their more budget friendly lines.
Rob Sabin, Editor Posted Feb 16, 2022 1:00 PM PST
Tim, on Monday we announced that the HU715Q UST is coming, which is more a step down to the HU85LA at $3,000 but with some updated features. I wouldn't be surprised if a tri-laser replacement for the HU85LA was in the works.
Rob H Posted Feb 16, 2022 1:54 PM PST
I was hoping LG would work on the latency of this model, >50ms is just not going to cut it. Like Sammie says, lots of potential with light source, etc for future models.
Jose Posted Feb 17, 2022 3:39 AM PST
I have some questions about this new LG HU710P:

-I need to know where is the air outlet; in the shift control knobs side like the 810? -Does it integrate the new Ti DLP chip with no picture frame and better mirrors angle defection?? -The JVC and SONY home theatre models has similar ANSI lumens; 1500 to 2200...
Isaac Posted Feb 17, 2022 6:01 AM PST
No 3D, no DEAL
Rob Sabin, Editor Posted Feb 17, 2022 9:23 AM PST
- Air outlets are on the sides, and sorry, but we don't know off hand specifically which gen chip is being used. We can inquire.

- It's true that Sony's 325 is only 1,500 lumens max and obviously below that for its best calibrated pic modes, and that the JVCs also aren't much brighter at their max. I would point out, however, that these LCoS projectors start out with much lower native blacks for significantly better contrast, and that they are 3-chip projectors that deliver equal color and white brightness. So it is not a fair comparison. I spent time with this projector for a few days before sending it to Sammie and liked the picture I got in our studio on our 110-inch matte white 1.3 gain screen in a totally dark room...but you can see that it's a little challenged.
Rob H Posted Feb 17, 2022 9:47 AM PST
Rob Sabin and Sammie, can you confirm what the offset is on this projector. I know this was a big issue for buyers of the LG HU810P, as LG states it as a 110% offset which should mean that the projector will be 10% below the bottom of the image when set on a table upright and 10% above the top of the picture when mounted upside down. Does actually have a 110% offset and then allow the +-60% vertical offset? Most users found the HU810P to have to max out the vertical offset to meet the 110% offset. I hope this makes sense. But basically is the neutral position for this project at 110% or does that require max using the vertical offset to achieve? Thanks
Rob Sabin, Editor Posted Feb 17, 2022 9:56 AM PST
We'll look into this, Rob.
Joel T Posted Feb 20, 2022 7:18 AM PST
Thank you Sam, Rob and team for your excellent reviews.

I am looking to buy my first projector after owning a TV that was probably made in 2010 and not more than 40" (with similarly lacking quality and functions). I have been reading reviews to try and decide which projector might be the best option for me (but all the details are a little overwhelming). Would you be able to provide a little advice?

What I am looking for: - 4K projector (native or not). - Normal, back-of-the-room projection. - Less than $2500 (although less that $2000 would be better). - Home theatre setup, but some level of portability desirable (lifestyle projector). The location would be loungeroom with some ambient light during the day. - 'Good enough' display quality (color, picture, brightness, etc.) - I would probably have a very average eye for missing details.

At first, my interest was piqued by the LG HU80KS project with its quality (i.e 4K) and portability. However, this is an old projector and seems to be out of stock everywhere. (If LG was to update this model, I would be very interested.)

After, I searched around for alternatives and found the XGIMI Horizon Pro 4K projector. This seemed to be amazing in its quality and features (based on their website). However, based on the review by John, it seems like it was only average in its quality.

I continued to look around and found this [LG HU710P 4K] projector. However, it seems to be very expensive for an image quality and brightness that isn't substantially better than the XGIMI Horizon Pro 4K.

The only other projector of interest that I found was the BenQ TK700STi 4K which seemed to be much better than the XGIMI Horizon Pro 4K in terms of picture quality, brightness and latency (nice to have). The only downside is the frequent lamp replacements.

As you can see, I am a little over my head. If you are able to provide any advice on which projector might be best, I would really appreciate it - whether it be any of these or other projectors.

Thank you.
Gastón Posted Feb 20, 2022 9:21 AM PST
Hi! Im looking for my first proyector, after lot of research i think that finally my choice is between the LG HU810 and the HU710. Which is better?

It will be in a basement with controlled light and dark walls and celling. Mostly for movies and some gaming.

Im not consider the HU715 because i dont have the need of the UST. Should I consider it?

Thanks a lot for your reviews guys it helps a lot!
Rob Sabin, Editor Posted Feb 20, 2022 9:41 PM PST
Gaston, no question that the HU810 is the best choice among these in terms of delivering brightness and overall best image quality, though input lag is mediocre on all of them.
JackB Posted Feb 21, 2022 8:07 AM PST
It's great that you published your calibrated settings. Even though they may not be perfect for me because my setup is a little different than yours they are much better for me than the OOTB from LG.
Rob Sabin, Editor Posted Feb 22, 2022 3:33 PM PST
Joel, with only 2K to $2.5K to spend I wouldn't necessarily be married to the idea of a solid state projector. But in any event you might wish to consider the following at or near your price range:

- Optoma UHZ50 4K laser projector, about $2,800 so more than your budget but good for its price.

- BenQ X3000i 4K LED projector at $2K, which is new. Not the best black levels, but it is solid state and very bright.

- Epson HC4010, which continues to be a very high quality projector at its $2,000 price. You sacrifice full 4K for Epson's 4K enhancement pixel shifting, which delivers half the full pixel count of a 4K projector, but as we've said many times it looks great a normal viewing distance.

- BenQ TK700STi or TK700, which is the new long throw version of the TK7000STi short throw projector.

- If you can stretch to $3K, the LG HU810 is a great choice as well for a laser projector.
Bill McLaughlin Posted Mar 3, 2022 9:37 AM PST
I have not been able to find out if this PJ has a vertical anamorphic stretch available. I have a dedicated home theater with an anamorphic lens and use it with my old JVC RS2. I would not want a PJ w/o vertical stretch since I have a Stewart anamorphic screen.
Rob Sabin, Editor Posted Mar 3, 2022 2:14 PM PST
Bill, our reviewer Sammie Prescott looked into this for you. Technically it's not set up for an anamorphic lens, but it might be workable. Here's hishis response to the question when I asked if the projector has a vertical stretch option:

"Yes and no. Not a true vertical stretch as found on something like a JVC anamorphic mode etc. It does have Vertical Zoom. What it does is stretches the image vertically and allows for the top and bottom to be manipulated as to how much the image is zoomed to reduce the letterboxing. You also have the ability to move the overall position of the image as well. It doesn't appear to do any cropping from the left or right. It may have a little cropping on top and bottom depending on what you do with the controls. This would ideally be what you would want to use with an anamorphic lens. Unfortunately I did not take off my DCR lens to test it but with the way it works this could be suitable."

Post a comment

 
Enter the numbers as they appear to the left