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Sanyo PLV-80
Large-scale Widescreen Projector

Review Contents
Best Home Theater Projector
Performance
4.5
Features
Ease of Use
Value
Sanyo PLV-80 Projector Sanyo PLV-80
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1000:1 Contrast Ratio
3000 Lumens
Street Price: n/a

Sanyo does something that few projector manufacturers do. In addition to producing models like the PLV-Z4 that are made for home theater, they build commercial-edition 16:9 widescreen projectors that pump out a LOT more light than the typical widescreen projector designed for home theater. This tradition began in earnest with the PLV-70, rated at 2200 ANSI lumens. That was followed by the industrial strength PLV-WF10 which throws a very real, no-nonsense 4000 ANSI lumens. The latest Sanyo model to follow in this tradition of big, bright widescreens is the PLV-80. This unique 3000-lumen projector is not designed to be a "bright home theater projector." Instead it is intended for larger venue applications. And for those who need its particular set of features and performance, nothing else will do.



Product Specifications

Full on/off contrast: 1000:1

ANSI lumens: 3000

Light engine: Three LCD panels, 1366x768 native resolution, 300W lamp.

Connection panel: One analog 15-pin VGA, one DVI-D (HDCP), one set of 5 BNCs for component video or computer, one 3-RCA component video on which the Y component jack can double as a composite input, one S-video, one Mini-DIN 8-pin control port. There is also one set of audio jacks that can be active with either the S-video, or component/composite video inputs.

Compatibility: HDTV 480p, 576p, 720p, 1035i, 1080i; 480i NTSC/NTSC 4.43, 576i PAL/PAL-N/PAL-M/SECAM; computer UXGA, SXGA+, SXGA, XGA, SVGA, VGA.

Zoom lens and throw distance: Variable based on lens selection.

Warranty: 3 years

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General Observations
Review Contents: Intro and Specs General Observations Observations and Conclusion