UHD50X right
The Optoma UHD50X

Optoma has continued its recent cavalcade of new home theater gaming projectors with three new models: the UHD50X, UHD30, and HD146X. They are available now for $1,599, $1,299, and $549, respectively.

At the top of the list is what's said to be the first ever UHD projector to offer the option of a 240Hz refresh rate, the UHD50X—though it doesn't do so at full native resolution. Over the projector's HDMI 2.0 (with HDCP 2.2 and MHL 2.1) port, it can display a 1080p/240Hz signal from a computer, 1080p/120Hz on a Xbox One, or 4K/60Hz. Of particular interest to gamers are the published input lag times. With Enhanced Gaming Mode enabled, the UHD50X has 25.8ms of lag with 4K source material and down to 15.7ms at 1080p/240Hz. The projector is compatible with HDR10 and HLG signals.

The UHD50X uses the Texas Instruments 0.47-inch 4K XPR chip and an 8-segment RGBWRGBW color wheel. Its 240W lamp light source outputs 3,400 ANSI lumens and, with Dynamic Black turned on, has a rated contrast ratio of 500,000:1. The lamp lasts 15,000 hours in Dynamic Black Mode (4,000 in Bright and 10,000 in ECO). The projector has a 1.3x optical zoom with a throw ratio of 1.21-1.59, and supports up to a 302-inch diagonal image. Add to that keystone correction and a 10% vertical lens shift, and the UHD50X has flexibility in its placement.

Alongside the UHD50X are the UHD30 and HD146X. Much like the UHD50X, the UHD30 also supports a 240Hz refresh rate with a 16ms input lag over its HDMI 2.0, HDCP 2.2 port in Enhanced Gaming Mode, is compatible with HDR10 and HLG, and outputs 3,400 ANSI lumens. It supports an image up to 302 inches with an optical zoom of 1.1x and a throw ratio of 1.5-1.66.

UHD30 front
The Optoma UHD30

The HD146X is an update to the HD143X released in early 2018. It's a native 1080p projector with a six-segment color wheel, 3,600 ANSI lumens, and a 1.1x optical zoom supporting an image up to 301 inches. With Enhanced Gaming mode, the HD146X's input lag is 16ms at 1080p/60Hz.

All three projectors are 3D capable.

HD146X right
The Optoma HD146X
 
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For more detailed specifications and connections, check out our Optoma UHD50X projector page.

To buy this projector, use Where to Buy online, or get a price quote by email direct from Projector Central authorized dealers using our E-Z Quote tool.

Comments (8) Post a Comment
logrhythmic Posted Mar 11, 2020 1:14 PM PST
Is this a misprint? With a 240hz refresh rate they should be able to manage a 4ms lag time - 16ms is absolutely unacceptable for a 240hz gaming monitor in 2020.
crabon Posted Mar 12, 2020 3:09 PM PST
Probably not a misprint: latency ("input lag") isn't necessarily equal to 1/throughput ("1/framerate"). You'll notice that most projectors support 60 Hz framerate, but will have input latencies much greater than 16 ms (~1/60 Hz; common numbers would be around 50 ms).

Imagine a line of 5 cars, each 10 feet long, driving bumper-to-bumper at 10 ft/s (one car-length per second). Every second, a car exits the line, and another enters the other end. Throughput is 1 car per second, but latency to get from one end of the line to the other is 5 seconds (not 1/throughput = 1/(1 Hz) = 1 second).

It's a lot like that, except the cars are data. At each of the "slots" in the line (5 in the example above), some different work is done on the data, transforming it from whatever comes of the HDMI cable to whatever signals ultimately drive the array of tiny mirrors inside the DLP chip.
Noah Posted Mar 12, 2020 11:30 PM PST
These companies could be stealing market share from TV manufacturers right now, but if they don't start making short throw the default standard, it will never happen.
logrhythmic Posted Mar 14, 2020 5:48 PM PST
crabon: I understand, but it's frustrating that the (non-DLP chip) hardware/firmware is so antiquated that we end up with 16ms latency. DLP should, in theory, be able to beat out everything but a CRT or laser scanning display. But here we are, unable to keep up with a $400 gaming monitor.
Keith Posted Mar 16, 2020 9:03 AM PST
The UHD 50X, in particular, is a really intriguing projector. Any idea when we might see a full review? Thanks,
Rob Sabin, Editor Posted Mar 17, 2020 10:40 AM PST
We are waiting for a sample but don't expect to get one for a few weeks.
James Posted Mar 19, 2020 10:12 AM PST
I just don't understand the difference between the UHD30 and 50X they look similar except for the price.
Mike Posted Jun 23, 2020 3:23 PM PST
Lens shift and better optical zoom lens.

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